Italian Fried Bow Ties (Farfellette) Cookies

Tuesday, September 24, 2019
I love these delicate fried bow tie dough ribbons that show up on the table every Christmas.

These are so addicting you can't stop eating them.

The crispy fried puffs of dough are so delicate and quite fragile with this delicious snowy sugar on top.

Grandma and mom spent hours of rolling, cutting and frying these to give away to family and friends around the holiday.

My Aunt Mary (grandma's daughter) also helped her own sister in law that actually sold these in Schenectady, N.Y., so we had an authentic recipe.

We called them wands in Utica, New York, or bow ties, Guanti, farfellette, and sometimes cenci (rags)

Don't be afraid to tackle this recipe, they're really easy to make and a must-try if you remember them in your family as a kid.

They happen to be my favorite little fried cookie and I was petrified to make the first time.

Honestly, there is nothing to it.

These bow ties are at the top of my list for Italian holiday cookies, like my other fried favorites including Struffoli (fried honey-covered balls), Italian Fried Panzerotti (fried stuffed pizza dough), and fried dough (zeppole).

Scroll down and check out the easy photos, instructions and at the end a quick Youtube video.





This is a fried thin cookie with powdered sugar on top and a black coffee called espresso in the cup on a white dollie










Italian Nicknames



There are so many American Italian given for these fried cookies.


It always amazed me how many nicknames Italians had for foods here in American.


I bet you may have come across these with some other given names?


In Jersey, wandi (gloves) in Rhode Island and my relatives in San Francisco called them bugia (liar’s knot).


Some in other areas on the globe in America called them angel wings.


These certainly well known in Italy and again, several names in different Regions became a new name by Region.


My search for Farfatelle history revealed an old, Catholic tradition called St. Joseph's Table and St. Joseph's Day was in March, not in December.


I was surprised that here in America, we made them around the Christmas holiday instead.



This is a fried thin cookie with powdered sugar on top and a black coffee called espresso in the cup on a white Dollie





Crunchy Delicious Fried Bites



Bow ties shatter with each bite, a light as airy perfect for an after-dinner treat anytime cookie treat.


I have seen them doused with honey on them or cinnamon sugar, that wasn't our style.


Honestly, they're made differently by all Regions in Italian, I have even another version, Crostoli from Veneto with orange and lemon in them, delicious but very different!





This is a fried thin cookie with powdered sugar on top on a white dollie




Tips:


  • Do not over flour the dough
  • Roll thin for best results
  • Keep a damp towel over the dough so it won't dry out
  • You can substitute any kind of flavored brandy for wine
  • Cool completely before adding the powdered sugar
  • Seal in an airtight container for storing




this is dough rolled out with a pastry cutter cut into strips




Ingredients You Will Need for Italian Fried Bow Ties


  • eggs
  • butter or oil
  • baking powder
  • vanilla
  • white wine or brandy
  • flour
  • oil for frying
  • powdered sugar




this is dough rolled out thin





Tools you will need for Farfellette Cookies


  • Sharp knife or pastry cutter
  • rolling pin
  • cutting board
  • frying pan
  • paper towels
  • tray






this is the dough in a silver metal bowl




Call Them Whatever You Like




No matter what you call these bow tie-shaped Italian fried cookies, they're certainly worth the time to make.


These certainly would light up everyone's face who received a huge platter of these from our family holiday time.


The only problem is you can't stop eating them!


These are honestly simple to make, just roll, tie into bows or leave straight, fry, cool and sprinkle with sugar.




Pin for later Italian Fried Bow Ties




This is a fried thin cookie with powdered sugar on top a pin to save for later




More Italian Desserts To Try




Best Sesame Cookies EVER!
Italian Struffoli
Zeppole







This is a fried thin cookie with powdered sugar on top and a black coffee called espresso in the cup on a white dollie
Italian Bow Tie Cookieshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z9j1kCTNMlYa cookie made into bows and deep fried with powdered sugar

Italian fried bows,ribbons (FARFELLETTE)

Yield: 40
Author:
prep time: 35 Mcook time: 4 Mtotal time: 39 M
These are fried Italian cookie sprinkled with powder sugar. They are light and airy and addicting. You can't stop at one. Perfect around the holiday table as they look like a blanket of snow over the top. Grandma, mom and all my Italian Aunts made these every year around Christmas time.

ingredients:

  • 12 eggs
  • 1/2 cup butter or oil
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/4 cup white wine or brandy
  • 6 cups flour

instructions:

How to cook Italian fried bows,ribbons (FARFELLETTE)

  1. Beat all wet ingredients, eggs, butter, wine, and vanilla in a bowl until creamy. 
  2. Add flour, baking powder until dough is the right consistency to roll out. 
  3. Roll out on floured board, as thin as possible., try not to over flour the board as they will get dry and tougher, (just lightly floured).
  4. Cut into a strip using a pastry cutter and tie in bows or twist like a ribbon, (a cutter with fluted edges works well and looks prettier)
  5. Fry in around 3 inches of oil or deep fryer on medium heat, until golden brown, drain on a dish lined with paper towels. 
  6. These should be light and golden not dark and they also float to the top, they take around 1 or 2 minutes on each side.
  7. Cool sprinkle with powdered sugar
Calories
45
Fat (grams)
19
Sat. Fat (grams)
9
Carbs (grams)
18
Net carbs
10
wands, bow ties, ribbons, fried cookies, italian fried cookies, deep fried bow tie cookies, holiday fried cookies, how to make bow tie cookies
Italian, pastry, fried cookies, fried dough ,Authentic cookies, Italian cookie dough
Italian
Created using The Recipes Generator











Pin for later Italian Fried Bow Ties




This is a fried thin cookie with powdered sugar on top pin for later










Disclosure: This recipe was originally shared in 2009. It was edited and re-published in 2019.

13 comments

  1. WHAT IS THE BEST OIL TO FRY THESE IN?

    ReplyDelete
  2. I use canola, my mother only used vegetable oil, either is fine. I cant tell the difference.

    ReplyDelete
  3. These are like what my grandmom made, only hers were dipped in boiled honey. Is there a different recipe? She also would make like a little bracelets with this special wooden dowel and textured mat.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Lucy, yes these are the same. She would make these into small ropes cut them and add them to boiling honey, its the same dough recipe as struffoli.

    ReplyDelete
  5. These are yummy, I have had them before. Did you make enough for me?

    ReplyDelete
  6. When do I put in the White wine and the vanilla?

    ReplyDelete
  7. "Anonymous" the recipe states to beat the ENTIRE WET ingredients, including the white wine & vanilla in the beginning ;)
    Just read it again & you'll see ;)

    I can't wait to make these - having grown up next to 3 Italian families, who made these every Christmas, I miss them
    Thanks for the recipe & Happy New Year!!!
    WildIrishRose

    ReplyDelete
  8. "Anonymous" the recipe states to add the ENTIRE WET ingredients, including the white wine & vanilla in the beginning ;)
    Just read it again & you'll see ;)

    I can't wait to make these - having grown up next to 3 Italian families, who made these every Christmas, I miss them.

    Thanks for the recipe & Happy New Year!!!

    ReplyDelete
  9. @Wild Rose thank you for the explanation appreciate it~ :) hope you like the recipe we love them... make these every year... its a Schenectady NY recipe.... :)

    ReplyDelete
  10. Can I make these without using the wine? Are these crisp like a wafer or soft like a cookie? My grandmother made a crisp treat, not sure if this is the one, but it all looks delicious!

    ReplyDelete
  11. @anonymous : Yes you can use orange juice... that's the only other substitution I have tried. Hope that helps

    ReplyDelete
  12. weird.. I was looking for a recipe similar to my Grandma Mary's for wands and found your blog.. and saw that you had an Aunt Mary from Schnectady! Mine lived a half hour away from there, but creepy coincidence on the name/location ;)

    I will be trying these, thanks!

    ReplyDelete

Thank you so much for your kind words and questions, I will try and reply to each of them. If you need help right away, contact me on Facebook or my email @pegasuslegend24@gmail.com